Antioxidants = Pigments of Color

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Antioxidants are vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that protect and repair our cells from damage caused by free radicals. Experts believe that damage to our cells play a huge part in a number of chronic diseases, including cancer, hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), arthritis, and many more. Antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables can play a major role in fighting off this damage to our cells and keeping our immune system strong.

As my journey continues through The Institute of Integrative Nutrition, I continue to see the incredible value that fruits and vegetables have on one’s health and wellness. To put it simply – incorporate fruits and vegetables into your diet as much as you can, as often as you can – it’s a no brainer. The health benefits are irreplaceable.

Generally speaking, the more colorful the fruit or vegetable is, the more antioxidants it contains. A few of the major antioxidants are beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E. Below you will find a list of specific fruits and vegetables that contain these powerful antioxidants.

Beta-carotene and other carotenoids: Apricots, asparagus, beets, broccoli, cantaloupe, carrots, corn, green peppers, kale, mangoes, turnip and collard greens, nectarines, peaches, pink grapefruit, pumpkin, squash, spinach, sweet potato, tangerines, tomatoes, and watermelon

Vitamin C: Berries, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cantaloupe, cauliflower, grapefruit, honeydew, kale, kiwi, mangoes, nectarines, orange, papaya, red, green or yellow peppers, snow peas, sweet potato, strawberries, and tomatoes

Vitamin E: Broccoli, carrots, chard, mustard and turnip greens, mangoes, nuts, papaya, pumpkin, red peppers, spinach, and sunflower seeds

Sunday Morning Omelet with a few Anti-Inflammatory Sides!

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Omelets are an excellent way to incorporate vegetables in your morning meal.  I use anything from tomatoes, spinach, mushrooms, green and red peppers, and maybe a tiny bit of cheese if your digestive system can handle it ;).

I typically do 1 full egg and 1 egg white to cut down on the saturated fat from the yolk.  I then, chop up all my vegetables and place them in a small pan with a tsp. of olive oil and sauté for a few minutes.  I whisk my eggs and the tiny bit of cheese mixture together and add to the veggie mix.  Cook on medium to low until most of your egg mixture is not runny and then with a spatula flip over and cook ~1 min and then fold over like an omelet.  Voila!  Delicious and nutritious breakfast for any morning!

I also add some blueberries, which are an anti-inflammatory food for those of you who have autoimmune diseases and have some silent (internal) inflammation.  Blueberries are good for my Hashimoto’s to reduce any internal inflammation.  I also added a Food for Life, Gluten Free, english muffin.  Why Gluten Free?  Products that contain gluten can also have an inflammatory response, not to mention it can prevent your thyroid from producing thyroid hormone, something that I, having Hashimoto’s, wants to avoid as much as possible.  Gluten free english muffins are perfect for breakfast and don’t make me feel bloated or weighed down and lethargic. 

For more information regarding my story and Hashimoto’s, please visit here.  Any questions regarding anti-inflammatory foods, please contact me at lacey.maiman@gmail.com . I would love to hear from you!